Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency Officer And Rescued Goose Are Two Birds Of A Feather

Darrell “Bones” Bernd has many friends, but none so notable as Honk.

Bones, Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agent, rescued the goose in July, WVLT reports, after untangling the bird from someone’s discarded fishing line on a lake in Bedford County.

“Thirty-four years ago I was hired out here just to mow grass,” Bones told WTVF. “Now, here I am babysitting a goose.”

Darrell
Source: Facebook/ Honk Goose
Darrell “Bones” Bernd rescued “Honk” the goose from a tangle of fishing line.

Believing Honk was once someone’s pet, Bernd spent the following months helping the bird get used to life in the wild. In turn, Honk imprinted on his new human friend.

The two have since become rather inseparable.

“I’ve actually had him following me for almost a mile,” Bones said.

Hink has followed Bones around ever since.
Source: Facebook/ Honk Goose
Hink has followed Bones around ever since they first met.

During that time, pictures of the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency officer and his feathered friend have been making the rounds on nearly every popular social media channel.

Bones believes the goose was someone's pet before he found it.
Source: Facebook/ Honk Goose
Bones believes the goose was someone’s pet before he found it.

Honk even has his own Facebook page now.

Honk may have imprinted on Bones when he was rescued.
Source: Facebook/ Honk Goose
Honk may have imprinted on Bones when he was rescued.

According to the Denver Channel, Bones is making sure Honk gets plenty of time around his own kind. The wildlife expert has left Honk with a flock of geese for sometimes days at a time before he flies back to his friend.

Bones hopes Honk will be able to migrate south with other geese friends in the flock. Until then, their friendship is a warm reminder to all who hear the story (or see it shared on Facebook).

Honk spends a few days with a local flock before coming back home.
Source: Facebook/ Honk Goose
Honk spends a few days with a local flock before coming back home.

“Just a little act of kindness, that’s all it took,” Bones said. “Maybe that’s something the world needs to learn today.”

Learn more in the video below.

Matthew Russell is a West Michigan native and with a background in journalism, data analysis, cartography and design thinking. He likes to learn new things and solve old problems whenever possible, and enjoys bicycling, going to the dog park, spending time with his daughter, and coffee.

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