Rescuers Remove 158 Pieces Of Plastic From A Tiny Sea Turtle’s Stomach

A baby turtle in Thailand was rescued when over 60 grams of plastic were removed from its stomach.

According to Vice World News, the sea turtle, who was found on Phuket’s west coast, is now recovering after rescuers pulled 158 shreds of plastic from its stomach.

The turtle is undergoing its recovery at the Sireetarn Marine Endangered Animals Rescue Center, according to the Bangkok Post.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

On August 17, the country’s Department of Marine and Coastal Resources shared the news of the turtle on Facebook, explaining that the little turtle was discovered beached and unwell. After taking it to a wildlife center for rehabilitation, an X-ray revealed a blockage in the animal’s intestines.

They expected the blockage to be marine debris and were saddened to discover 158 individual pieces of plastic, including plastic rope, plastic fabric, hard plastic, and plastic bags. They shared photos of the turtle and plastic in question:

Photo: Facebook/Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
Photo: Facebook/Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
Photo: Facebook/Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
Photo: Facebook/Department of Marine and Coastal Resources

Thankfully, they noted that since removing the blockage, the turtle seems to be recovering well. It’s being monitored closely and receiving care, including a feeding tube, until it’s strong enough to survive on its own. The turtle is already showing signs of improvement, including swimming better and being able to eat little bits on its own.

According to Vice World News, Thailand is a leading consumer of plastic globally, dumping 30,000 to 40,000 tons of plastic in its oceans each year.

Photo: PXFUEL

Kongkiat Kittiwattanwong, a Phuket Marine Biological Center researcher, said to Vice News that the turtle’s reality is a direct consequence of human activity.

Kittiwattanwong went on to say that in order to reduce the instances of marine injury and other consequences related to trash and marine waste, plastic use needs to be reduced.

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