18 Billion Animals Are Slaughtered Every Year Without Being Eaten

The global food system harbors a troubling reality: annually, 18 billion animals, including chickens, turkeys, pigs, sheep, goats, and cows, are slaughtered but never consumed.

This staggering figure represents not just a massive waste of life but also a significant environmental issue.

The resources—feed, water, land—invested in raising these animals become essentially pointless, reports Weather.com, a squandering of environmental and economic resources.

Globally, about one-third of all food produced is lost or wasted.
Photo: Pexels
Globally, about one-third of all food produced is lost or wasted.

Why Does This Happen?

Reasons for this immense waste vary globally. In developing countries, livestock loss is often due to diseases, compounded by inadequate storage and transportation infrastructure, reports the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. In contrast, developed nations experience waste primarily at the consumption stage, driven by factors such as supermarket overstocking, oversized restaurant portions, and household food discarding.

As Phys.org reports, countries like the United States, South Africa, and Brazil are prominent examples of this kind of waste, while India has a relatively lower per capita meat waste rate.

Every year 18 billion animals, including chickens, turkeys, pigs, sheep, goats, and cows, are slaughtered but never consumed.
Photo: Pexels
Every year 18 billion animals, including chickens, turkeys, pigs, sheep, goats, and cows, are slaughtered but never consumed.

Environmental Impact

The environmental implications of this wastage are profound. As the Breakthrough Institute reports, Livestock production, particularly beef, is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

The FAO initially estimated livestock’s contribution at 14.5% of global greenhouse gas emissions, but recent data suggest this number could be between 11.1% and 19.6%. This range reflects various factors, including different global warming potentials of greenhouse gases and advancements in emission measurement methods, the BI reports.

The annual cost of global food waste is approximately $1 trillion.
Photo: Pexels
The annual cost of global food waste is approximately $1 trillion.

Tackling the Problem

According to a study published in the journal Sustainable Production and Consumption, addressing this issue requires a multi-faceted approach. In developing countries, the focus should be on improving animal husbandry practices and enhancing storage and transportation infrastructure.

For industrialized nations, the key lies in behavioral changes like mindful consumption and reducing portion sizes. Educating consumers on proper food storage can also play a significant role, especially in countries where meat consumption is deeply embedded in the culture.

Developing countries often experience food waste due to poor storage and transportation.
Photo: Pexels
Developing countries often experience food waste due to poor storage and transportation.

A Philosophical Perspective on Agricultural Animal Deaths

Interestingly, the debate extends to the ethics of plant production. As Anthropocene Magazine reports, philosophers note the lack of rigorous data on the number of wild animals killed in agriculture, contrasting sharply with the more clear-cut numbers of animals consumed as meat. They argue that traditional veganism might inadvertently cause more animal deaths than a diet including ethically-raised, free-range meats. However, this claim is controversial and highlights the complexity and uncertainty surrounding the scope and impact of animal deaths in agriculture.

Livestock farming, particularly cattle rearing, not only demands vast amounts of feed and water but also significantly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions.
Photo: Pexels
Livestock farming, particularly cattle rearing, not only demands vast amounts of feed and water but also significantly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions.

A Wider Environmental Perspective

Beyond the direct loss of animal life, the environmental ramifications of this wastage in the food system are multifaceted. Scientific studies show that livestock farming, particularly cattle rearing, not only demands vast amounts of feed and water but also significantly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions through enteric fermentation, manure management, and land-use changes. These activities release methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide, exacerbating climate change. Environmental science in this area can be complex, as there is great variability in greenhouse gas emission estimates from livestock.

The loss of 18 billion animals annually in the food production process is a significant ethical and environmental issue.
Photo: Pexels
The loss of 18 billion animals annually in the food production process is a significant ethical and environmental issue.

Cultural and Behavioral Shifts as a Solution

The profound waste of animal lives calls for a cultural and behavioral shift in both developed and developing countries. In industrialized nations, where waste largely occurs at the consumer level, there’s a growing need for awareness and education about mindful consumption, appropriate portion sizes, and effective food storage practices. In contrast, developing countries face challenges at the production and storage stages, necessitating improvements in animal health management and infrastructure. Addressing these issues is not just a matter of reducing waste but also about lessening the environmental impact and respecting animal lives.

The loss of 18 billion animals annually in the food production process is a significant ethical and environmental issue. Systemic changes in food production and consumption patterns are a global necessity. We need both technological improvements and shifts in cultural practices, and only by addressing these challenges can we move towards a more sustainable and respectful food system.

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