Volunteers Rush To Save 5 Stranded Dolphins

Five dolphins were successfully rescued from Duck Creek after becoming stranded there.

Volunteers with the International Fund for Animal Welfare were alerted of the stranded dolphins early Sunday morning.

According to Cape Code Times, there were initially six dolphins that needed help, but one ended up dying.

Photo: flickr/bobistraveling

According to the news outlet, the coordinator for stranded animals, Misty Niemeyer, shared that the responders faced tough conditions during the rescue, including rough terrain and thick mud.

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Rescuers were successfully able to free the five stranded dolphins, a sixth dolphin ended up dying. Additionally, a seventh dolphin was reported stranded, but bystanders pushed it into the bay – twice.

Photo: Pixabay

While those people who tried to save the dolphin probably meant well, it’s important to leave any stranded animals alone and call for trained professionals to help. By pushing the dolphin back into the bay, they put it at risk of being re-stranded, injured, or killed.

As Neimeyer said to the outlet, “We ask that people don’t touch or handle a stranded animal. If we don’t get them out of that area, there is a high likelihood of restranding.”

Photo: Snappy Goat

The dolphins they did rescue were relocated to Herring Cove.

The IFAW has been working tirelessly to ensure stranded animals have the best possible outcome. According to their site, they’ve increased the release rate of stranded dolphins from 15% to 80%! In other words, thanks to their efforts, an additional 65% of stranded dolphins can be released back into the wild.

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