The Clean Air Act Is Critical To Our Environment, So Why Are Some Lawmakers Still Trying To Attack It?

Global warming has reached its highest point on record — and it’s still increasing. What’s worse, at times our own Congress has been working against solving this crisis.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency report, Global Anthropogenic Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions: 1990-2020, global carbon emissions from fossil fuels have significantly increased since 1900, but CO2 emissions have increased by about 90%, with emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes contributing about 7 8% of the total greenhouse gas emissions increase from 1970 to 2011.

CO2 emissions have increased by about 90% since 1970.
CO2 emissions have increased by about 90% since 1970.

As seen in the rest of the world, agriculture, deforestation, and other land-use changes have been the second-largest contributors to this environmental damage in the U.S. As the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions reports, “Globally, the primary sources of greenhouse gas emissions are electricity and heat (31%), agriculture (11%), transportation (15%), forestry (6%) and manufacturing (12%). Energy production of all types accounts for 72 percent of all emissions.”

Under the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is able to set standards limiting carbon dioxide and other dangerous emissions.
Under the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is able to set standards limiting carbon dioxide and other dangerous emissions.

U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions fell by about 11% in 2020 as travel restrictions were in effect due to the COVID pandemic, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reports. However, the EIA’s January 2021 Short-Term Energy Outlook maintains that energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the United States will increase in 2021. Total energy-related CO2 emissions may continue to increase to 4.8 billion metric tons in 2021 and 4.9 billion metric tons in 20224.

U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions fell by about 11% in 2020 as travel restrictions were in effect due to the COVID pandemic, but they could rise if action is not taken soon.
U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions fell by about 11% in 2020 as travel restrictions were in effect due to the COVID pandemic, but they could rise if action is not taken soon.

Under the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is able to set standards limiting carbon dioxide and other dangerous emissions. At times, however, Congress members motivated by special interests have taken actions that only serve to accelerate the current climate emergency. As the Center Action Fund reports, since January 2017, Congress has introduced at least 76 attacks on the Clean Air Act5.

Help protect the Clean Air Act!
Help protect the Clean Air Act!

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