African Rain Frogs Look Like Little Angry Avocados

Nature is full of strange little creatures, some of which are quite cute. But there is one species of frog that is incredibly adorable. The Black Rain Frog lives in the southern slopes of the Cape Fold Belt down in South Africa. The small amphibian can survive at elevations as high as 3,300ft. They’re a burrowing species of frogs so they don’t require water as their natural habitat is the fynbos and forests.

Perhaps the cutest thing about the frog’s appearance is that it resembles an upset avocado. He’s not actually sad, that’s just the frog’s natural face. The Instagram account, csirogram, further explained that what makes this frog’s look even more unusual is their ability to puff themselves up.

When under threat, this amphibian can fill itself with air in order to make itself look even rounder – very similar to a pufferfish.

Another interesting fact about the Black Rain Frog is that the females can secrete a sticky substance from their back during mating season in order to ensure that the male doesn’t fall off. The whole process is called adhesive amplexus.

But the most peculiar thing about these small frogs is their expressive faces, and that is what has people on the internet so intrigued by them. There have been plenty of comments about their appearance. One person posted, “If I was an animal, this would be me” – a sentiment most of us could probably agree with. Someone else mentioned how they’d use the frog’s adorably sad face to their advantage, stating they’d be carrying the amphibian around with them in their pocket and then when called out for line cutting, they’d just use the power of the frog’s face to get away with it – a brilliantly diabolical plan. And a third user stated, “They can roll down cliffs and hills to get away from predators. Awesome”.

What do you think of these cute frogs? Check out some more of the frogs’ pictures below:

Anastasia is an American writer and journalist living in Dublin, Ireland. Her Twitter is @AnastasiaArell5.

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