Baby Tortoises Show Up In The Galapagos Islands For The First Time In 100 Years!

Proper greatergood_ctg_belowtitle

After 100 years of dwindling birth populations, attacks by invasive species, and heavy casualties from fishing and whaling, baby tortoises were found born in the Galapagos Islands.

This is huge news for a species that has been struggling to survive for a century, relying on humans raising young tortoises bred in captivity until they are large enough to not fall prey to rats and predators.

Finding naturally born young is evidence that conservation efforts are helping rebuild the islands ecosystem, which has been damaged, possibly irrevocably, since the 17th century.

Photo: Ian Kennedy/Shutterstock


Rats have been the biggest threat to the tortoise population since their accidental introduction to the island via ships infested with them. The rats root out nests and eat the eggs and newborns of numerous island species, hurting more than just the tortoise population. Thankfully, the island of Pinzón, home to the newborn tortoises, was declared rat-free in 2012, and the results are already showing.

Pixabay

It’s encouraging to see conservation efforts pay off so quickly. The tortoise population has gone from around 150 in 1959 to almost 500 today. Celebration is certainly in order, but there is still more hard work ahead. And it’s never too late to help the cause.

Humpback Whales Erupt From the Pacific As Central California Earthquake Prompts Mass Breaching Event: Click “Next” below!

The Animal Rescue Site is a place where people can help provide food and care to millions of animals in need, both in the U.S. and around the world. In addition to sharing personal rescue stories, shopping for the cause, and signing petitions, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on a purple button to help animals. Visit The Animal Rescue Site and click today - it's free!
Proper greatergood_ctg_belowcontent
TRS Ora Player